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Prince Harry

Even republicans approve, surely?

Microwaving tea

Recommended by scientists, apparently. Disgusting

No televised election debates

Disappointing; we were rather looking forward to May vs The Sturge

Broadchurch

Olivia Coleman = nailed-on Future National Treasure

Spring Bank holidays

Too close together! Very bad!

Bin-mageddon

“I queued for THREE BLOODY HOURS at B&Q for a new recycling bin! The entire town’s in CHAOS”

S-Town

To be listened to whole on a long journey for maximum effect

Using a proper paper map

Strangely satisfying

The “Flash” Flash ad

It’s back! Possibly the best ever singing dog in an advert ever

Crap tacos

Reheated, with too much chilli: middle-class kebabs, basically

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    « Chattering class: this week's ups and downs | Main | How to respond when someone says they're an accountant »
    Friday
    Dec112015

    Art of hot desking: being seen to be displeased by a dirty mouse

    Having to sit at a different desk every day or for a few weeks at a time is increasingly normal in offices, as the management tries to facilitate flexible working and foster more creative environments, etc etc. But, the one thing nobody talks about amid all the guff about dynamic workspaces is the business of having to deal with someone else's filth.

    If you have your own keyboard and mouse at the same work station every day you can relax in the knowledge that it's only your own questionable sticky blotches on the mouse and only your own splashes of wasabi sauce smearing the space bar. But if you're having to jump on to any old desk every day your first five minutes at work will be spent inspecting those smears and addressing the situation with antibacterial wipes.

    And we love being self-righteous about it, don't we? We like to flap a bit as we're disinfecting the mouse and make comments about other people's dirt and low standards, to make sure everyone in earshot understands that we don't approve, and to imply that we would never leave a work station in such a state – only to go on and scatter flakes of croissant in between the keys and conveniently have to 'rush off' at the end of the day without making time to clear them up.

    Flickr: Martijn van Exel

    References (1)

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    Reader Comments (1)

    We’ve recently started hot-desking in our office and have found it really beneficial in creating a more social and enjoyable working environment.

    We've resolved the 'dirty mouse' problem by giving each member of staff their own wireless keyboard and mouse of their choice.

    We’ve found that the lack of dedicated space doesn’t make people feel more isolated but instead more social as hot-desking allows them to interact with other staff members more often who previously sat at the opposite end of the office. Here are some other articles that you may find useful; http://www.lucidica.com/blog/random-technology/the-worlds-best-hot-desking-environment/

    March 21, 2016 | Unregistered CommenterEllen

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