Related Posts with Thumbnails
The Book

Out now at Amazon | Waterstones

Middle Class Handbook on Twitter
Chattering Class

Prince Harry

Even republicans approve, surely?

Microwaving tea

Recommended by scientists, apparently. Disgusting

No televised election debates

Disappointing; we were rather looking forward to May vs The Sturge

Broadchurch

Olivia Coleman = nailed-on Future National Treasure

Spring Bank holidays

Too close together! Very bad!

Bin-mageddon

“I queued for THREE BLOODY HOURS at B&Q for a new recycling bin! The entire town’s in CHAOS”

S-Town

To be listened to whole on a long journey for maximum effect

Using a proper paper map

Strangely satisfying

The “Flash” Flash ad

It’s back! Possibly the best ever singing dog in an advert ever

Crap tacos

Reheated, with too much chilli: middle-class kebabs, basically

Latest Comments
The Periodic Table of the Middle Class
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    « Who’s who at the picnic | Main | CHATTERING CLASS: SHOOTING THE BREEZE »
    Thursday
    Jul182013

    maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes

    Never in living memory have there been so many sizes, shapes and even colours of tomato on offer in any self-respecting middle class high street. Your fridge may have at least two types of tomato – possibly a punnet of cherry tomatoes for snacking and lazy salads, and half a dozen larger tomatoes – probably on the vine – for slicing, not to mention the jars of passata, tubes of purée and tins of chopped tomatoes multiplying in your food cupboard. We can’t tell you which ones to buy, but we can help you navigate the psychology of your choices.

    Self-actualisation – Heritage tomatoes
    Also known as heirloom tomatoes, these score highly on the middle class snob-o-meter. The term encompasses many varieties (the Isle of Wight seems to be the MC on-trend heritage tomato this summer – and only the MCs could have an on-trend tomato) in many shapes and, most notably, colours, but what they have in common is that they are all pure varieties, grown from seed generation after generation (not hybrids like the more common uniform round tomatoes). They taste sweeter, yes, but their attraction is as much in the concept – in-bred and individual, with a proven pedigree, brought to you by small producers and sold for a suitably exclusive price.

    Esteem – San Marzano
    The ultimate cooking tomato comes with its own DOPO (denomination of protected origin). These are not any-old plum tomatoes, they are grown outside Naples, around Mt Vesuvius. Slightly longer and slightly thinner, their thicker flesh and less-watery insides contribute to the perfect pasata. Because even if you’re just knocking together some cheap Italian peasant food, it should be authentic cheap Italian peasant food.

    Love/Belonging – on-the-vine
    Whatever variety of tomato you are eating, the presence of the vine allows you to feel a connection to the growing process. As if you’ve just picked them fresh from the greenhouse, not fresh from Clerkenwell Waitrose. Opening the packet also affords a whiff of tomato plant – so reassuringly summery.

    Safety – cherry/baby plum/pomodorino
    This is the go-to salad tomato of choice, partly because they are sweet and juicy, partly because they just look so adorable. Even kids will eat them. What’s frightening is just how recently it was that cherry tomatoes seemed exotic.

    Physiological – supermarket generic
    Yawn. Boring and bland. Bred to ripen uniformly and look nice in the shops, but messing with the genetics has also messed with the sugar content – these are a merely a receptacle for salad dressing at best. The fact that you can pick them up for £1 a plastic carton tells you all you need to know about how they might taste.

    Bubbling under – beefsteak
    There’s something no-nonsense and back-to-basics about a beef tomato. It’s not pretending to be fancy, it’s just doing its (very tasty) job. And the gourmet burger revolution could be just the boost it needs.

    Flickr: hflournoy1, Kristen Bonardi Rapp, plindberg, Gudlyf, Bitterjug

    References (24)

    References allow you to track sources for this article, as well as articles that were written in response to this article.
    • Response
      Response: HP Drivers
      HP Printer Drivers Utility is able to download the latest official drivers for your Printer, Fix driver problems and keep them updated
    • Response
      Response: my review here
      Nice Web-site, Stick to the fantastic work. With thanks.
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: cut costs back
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: piczoom.net
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: Orang ganteng
    • Response
      Response: watchut
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: kids toys
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: linked web-site
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: advice
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: Anastasie
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: watches
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: Victor
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response
      Response: Vita
      The Middle Class Handbook - Blog (Home) - maslow's hierarchy of tomatoes
    • Response

    Reader Comments (7)

    Please don't store tomatoes in the refrigerator.

    July 18, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCynthy

    @Cynthy - Can you tell me why this is? I've always wondered as I store mine in the refrigerator all the time! Thanks

    July 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLizzy

    Tomatoes get mushy/mealy in the refrigerator. They end up tasting like the horrible winter greenhouse tomatoes rather than the glorious fruit they are.

    July 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCynthy

    Tomatoes get mushy/mealy in the refrigerator. They end up tasting like the horrible winter greenhouse tomatoes rather than the glorious fruit they are.

    July 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCynthy

    Tomatoes get mushy/mealy in the refrigerator. They end up tasting like the horrible winter greenhouse tomatoes rather than the glorious fruit they are.

    July 19, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterCynthy

    PostPost a New Comment

    Enter your information below to add a new comment.

    My response is on my own website »
    Author Email (optional):
    Author URL (optional):
    Post:
     
    Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>